US women squeak out 2-1 win over Spain

first_imgJune 25, 2019 /Sports News – National US women squeak out 2-1 win over Spain FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailGeert van Erven/Soccrates/Getty Images(PARIS) — The U.S. Women’s National Team beat Spain 2-1 on Monday to advance to the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup quarterfinals.Megan Rapinoe scored on two penalty kicks, helping the U.S. win its first game in the knockout round of the tournament.The U.S. will now play France in a quarterfinal match set for Friday in Paris.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Beau Lundcenter_img Written bylast_img read more

5 Candidates Vie to Replace Carolyn McCarthy

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Five candidates on both sides of the aisle have expressed interest in replacing Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-Mineola) since she announced her plans to retire, setting up likely heated primary battles this summer.The crowded field of hopefuls that has emerged in recent weeks so far includes three Republicans and two Democrats, but only time will tell how many will be on ballots for the June 24 congressional primary elections. One party leader has vowed to let party faithful decide for themselves at the polls.“There is the possibility of a primary contest for the Democratic nomination for Congress in the 4th [congressional district],” Nassau Democratic Chairman Jay Jacobs recently wrote in an email to committee members, referring to McCarthy’s seat. “I have decided NOT to take a position in this race, should there be one.”Nassau County Legislative Minority Leader Kevan Abrahams (D-Freeport) threw his hat in the ring Wednesday after Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice, a Garden City resident, announced her plans to run in January.Members of the Nassau GOP have been lining up behind Bruce Blakeman, the former presiding officer of the Nassau legislature and current Long Beach resident, who announced his candidacy last month.Legis. Francis X. Becker (R-Lynbrook), who lost to McCarthy in 2010 and ’12, said he wants to try again. So has Frank Scaturro, a lawyer from New Hyde Park who Becker beat in a GOP primary for the same race two years ago. Scaturro lost on the Conservative line in that race.McCarthy, a gun-control advocate who took office in 1997 after her husband was murdered in the Long Island Rail Road massacre, endorsed Rice.Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford), the lone Republican among the five-member Long Island delegation in the House of Representatives, endorsed Blakeman.President Barack Obama won 63 percent of the vote in McCarthy’s district in ’12. The district stretches from New Hyde Park in the northwest corner to Jones Beach State Park to the southeast.last_img read more

Solskjaer keen to convince De Gea, Martial to stay at Man Utd

first_imgAnd he revealed that he rejected numerous opportunities to leave the club, and land a more cast iron guarantee of first team football, during his spell under Alex Ferguson.“I had loads of offers and possibilities to move but the manager (Ferguson) sat me down and told me I was going to be an important part of his team, his squad and I was going to play enough games,” said Solskjaer.“I felt privileged to play here. I am also stubborn. The club agreed to sell me to Spurs one time and I said ‘no, thank you.’ My agent wanted me to go, but I knew I was at the best place.“If you are a regular at Manchester United, I think you should grasp the opportunity to stay here and become part of the history.”Martial’s agent Philippe Lamboley was a vocal critic of Mourinho, while De Gea saw a move to Real Madrid fall through in 2015 and has been linked with Paris Saint-Germain and Juventus in recent times.But Solskjaer, who is hoping to have all of Martial, Alexis Sanchez and Romelu Lukaku back available for Bournemouth’s visit on Sunday, believes Martial could feature more as a central striker than he did under Mourinho.“He can play as a number nine, of course, because he’s got strength and he’s good at holding the ball up,” said Solskjaer. “But he is fantastic at one-on-one, so he can also play on the left or right wing.“I’ve had chats with him and he can play in all those positions.“As a defender you don’t want to be dropping off towards your own goals with him running at you. So we need to get Anthony facing forwards.”Share on: WhatsApp Manchester, United Kingdom | AFP | Ole Gunnar Solskjaer may only be in charge of Manchester United for the remainder of this season, but the interim manager wants to see Anthony Martial and David de Gea sign long-term contracts at Old Trafford.United have activated one-year extensions for both players in recent weeks, meaning they are tied to the club until the end of next season.But forward Martial and goalkeeper De Gea remain locked in talks with executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward over longer deals with no sign of an end to the impasse imminent.Solskjaer, who himself is only under contract with the Premier League club until the summer, may have limited say in United’s long-term strategy.But the popular former United forward, who has made an early case for the job on a permanent basis with comprehensive victories over Cardiff and Huddersfield in his first two games in charge, clearly hopes to leave his mark at Old Trafford by helping secure the services of two key players.“I know the club want them to sign, of course, because they are top quality players,” said Solskjaer.“It’s down to the players, but when you’re at Man United there isn’t a lot of greener grass on the other side.“You are at the best place. It’s the biggest club in the world.“For me, I would hope I can help or guide these players to maybe tip them over to thinking they want to stay at this club.”Solskjaer, whose appointment as interim manager in place of the sacked Jose Mourinho has proved hugely popular with the club’s fans, spent 11 years as a player with United until injury ended his career in 2007.last_img read more

Public urged to have their say on footpath and cycleway from Carrigart to Downings

first_imgThe Donegal public has been urged to have their say on the proposed footpath and cycleway project on Carrigart to Downings regional road. It is planned to extend along the western margin of the R248, from its beginning near Carrigart to its junction with a minor road close to the Rosepenna Hotel and Golf Resort in Downings. This represents a total distance of approximately 2.6km.For much of its length, the combined footpath/cycleway is proposed to be 3m in width and will occupy the existing roadside verge. At the southern end of the site, the verge is replaced by a strip of hardstand and in this location, it is proposed to create a shared pathway which is approximately 2m in width so as to fit within this area.The works will involve traffic management, excavation, kerb laying, concrete works, backfilling and any associated accommodation works.Submission and observations with respect to the proposed development dealing with:The implications of the proposed development for proper planning and sustainable development in the area concerned,The likely effects on the environment of the proposed development,The likely significant effects of the proposed development on a European site, if carried out.can be made free of charge to the board at An Bord Pleanala, 64 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1 before 4:30pm on the 15th November 2019.  Public urged to have their say on footpath and cycleway from Carrigart to Downings was last modified: November 4th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Gritters dispatched as more wintry weather hits Donegal

first_imgCouncil gritters will be out on all main roads in Donegal ahead of another night of frost and possible snow showers.Temperatures will drop to lows of 2 to -2C in the north west and there is a risk of wintry showers in the area.Met Eireann has warned that it will be a cold nigh with a “widespread frost and some freezing fog patches.” Tuesday will start as a cold and dry day with sunny spells and temperatures of between 3 and 7 degrees. “The odd shower may still affect some Atlantic coastal parts, and fog may linger in places,” said forecasters.ALL routes will be gritted from 8PM on Mon. 16/12. Donegal gritting route index as follows:06: Inishowen West04: Inishowen South01: National Primary North02: National Primary Central03: National Primary South07: Milford South08: Milford North09: Cill Ulta East10: Cill Ulta West11: Na Rosa12: Binswilly13: Stranorlar North14: Stranorlar East15: Stranorlar West16: Donegal West17: Donegal North18: Donegal South19: Donegal National Secondary05: Inishowen EastBT: Buncrana TownLT: Letterkenny TownGritters dispatched as more wintry weather hits Donegal was last modified: December 16th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

30 horses died in 6 months of racing at Santa Anita. Why still remains unknown

first_imgARCADIA — Santa Anita on Sunday wrapped up a nightmarish six months of racing, which included 30 fatalities and the ouster of a Hall of Fame trainer, while leaving a trail of unanswered questions to ponder as the local thoroughbred racing circuit now moves to Los Alamitos for a 10-day meet beginning Saturday.Tim Ritvo, COO of Santa Anita’s parent company, the Stronach Group, pulled a no-show and did not appear in the press box after the final race of the meet to address what surely would have …last_img read more

49ers’ Dee Ford shocks Florida teen with a touching gift

first_imgDee Ford likes to use music to help clear his mind. The day before he was set to test his injured hamstring at 49ers practice in Florida, he decided to stop into a nearby music store in Bradenton.Adam Birmingham, a local high school senior with big musical dreams, was also there Tuesday. That was hardly unusual. Birmingham has been at the Bradenton Guitar Center store nearly every day for months, admiring and even playing a guitar that’s beyond his means, and otherwise out of reach.What …last_img read more

Mandela’s wish for South Africa

first_imgNelson Mandela bade farewell to Parliament on Monday 10 May 2004 – 10 years to the day after he was sworn in as South Africa’s first democratically elected president.In a cynical world, Mandela said, South Africa had become “an inspiration to many. We signal that good can be achieved among human beings who are prepared to trust, prepared to believe in the goodness of people.” (Image: Nelson Mandela Foundation)Brand South Africa ReporterNelson Mandela bade farewell to Parliament on Monday 10 May 2004 – 10 years to the day after he was sworn in as South Africa’s first democratically elected president – urging South Africans never to forget their past, but to use it as a guide in overcoming the challenges still facing the country.His wish, he said, was that South Africans “never give up on the belief in goodness”.“Let us never be unmindful of the terrible past from which we come,” Mandela told a special sitting of Parliament in Cape Town. That memory should be used “not as a means to keep us shackled to the past in a negative manner, but rather as a joyous reminder of how far we have come and how much we have achieved”.The country’s history of division, injustice and suffering ought to “inspire us to celebrate our own demonstration of the capacity of human beings to progress, to go forward, to improve, to do better”.Read more: 72 days that shaped South AfricaMandela’s speech in fullTwo decades ago, Mandela was installed as head of South Africa’s government, with FW de Klerk and Thabo Mbeki as joint second-in-commands, during a decisive period that ultimately set the “rainbow nation” on its path to peaceful democratic rule.Decade of democracyTen years ago, the trio of Mandela, Mbeki and De Klerk unveiled a commemorative inscription at Parliament marking South Africa’s historic path as well as celebrating 10 years of democracy.A guiding principle in South Africa’s search for a non-racial inclusive democracy, Mandela said, “has been that there are good men and women to be found in all groups and from all sectors of society; and that in an open and free society those South Africans will come together to jointly and co-operatively realise the common good”.In a cynical world, Mandela said, South Africa had become “an inspiration to many. We signal that good can be achieved amongst human beings who are prepared to trust, prepared to believe in the goodness of people.“Historical enemies succeeded in negotiating a peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy exactly because we were prepared to accept the inherent capacity for goodness in the other.“My wish is that South Africans never give up on the belief in goodness, that they cherish that faith in human beings as a cornerstone of our democracy.”National unity“Let us refrain from chauvinistic breast-beating,” Mandela said. “But let also not underrate what we have achieved in establishing a stable and progressive democracy where we take freedoms seriously; in building national unity in spite of centuries of apartheid and colonial rule; in creating a culture in which we increasingly respect the dignity of all.”Mandela warned of the challenges still facing South Africa – in particular poverty, unemployment, and HIV/Aids – saying that democracy “must bring its material fruits to all, particularly the poor, marginalised and vulnerable. Our belief in the common good ultimately translates in to a deep concern for those that suffer want and deprivation of any kind”.Referring to himself as an “retired old pensioner”, Mandela – uncharacteristically dressed in a suit – told the assembled MPs that he was grateful to have been elected to lead the country during its turbulent years.“This old man . notes with immense satisfaction and pride today the persistence and strengthening of that spirit of generosity, magnanimity and confident hopefulness about the future of our nation.”‘A modest man’Mandela indicated that he would be retiring from his active lifestyle, which continued even after he handed the presidential reins over to Thabo Mbeki in 1999.Mandela also praised Mbeki, saying that no president or prime minister in South Africa’s history could “claim to have done more for the people and the country”.Mbeki, Mandela said, was “a modest man and I know he would prefer that I do not sing his personal praises, but his achievement as president and national leader is the embodiment of what our nation is capable of”.De Klerk, Mandela’s predecessor as president and the man who released the ANC leader from prison, told the members of the legislature that 10 May was “the day of Nelson Mandela, of Madiba . a man who towered out like a giant in this transformation, a man who has shown all of us what it means to really build reconciliation”.De Klerk, who retired from politics in 1997, praised all South Africans for their role in bringing about change in the country, asking them to join hands for further socio- economic transformation, saying the challenges were still huge. “We must ensure that South Africa becomes a winning nation.”Mandela left the chamber assisted by De Klerk, as the gathered MPs sang: “Rolihlahla Mandela, freedom is in your hands, show us the way to freedom in this land of Africa”.FULL SPEECH: Mandela’s final address to ParliamentAddress during a joint sitting of Parliament to mark 10 years of democracy in South Africa, Monday 10 May 2004, Cape TownMadam Speaker, Mister President, Honourable MembersWe are deeply moved and humbled by your magnanimous gesture in inviting us to address this joint session of the two houses of parliament. We are aware, Madam Speaker, that an exception to the standing rules had to be made in order to allow a retired old pensioner, who is neither a member of parliament nor the serving head of state of any country, to address you.We remember, Madam Speaker, that on this exact day ten years ago democratic South Africa celebrated its ceremonial birth with the inauguration of its first president and two deputy presidents.We recall the joy and excitement of a nation that had found itself: the collective relief that we had stepped out of our restrictive past and the expectant air of walking into a brighter future.The national climate was one of magnanimity and a great generosity of spirit. As a people we were enormously proud of what we had achieved, negotiating amongst ourselves a peaceful resolution to what was regarded as one of the most intractable situations of conflict in the world.Hope and confidenceWe were not unaware of or blind to the extent, depth and gravity of the challenges ahead of us as we set out on that day to transform, reconstruct and develop our nation and our society.However, the overwhelming feelings in those early days of democratic nationhood were of hope and confidence. We had miraculously – as many said – transcended the deep divisions of our past to create a new inclusive democratic order; we had confidence that as a nation we would similarly confront and deal with the challenges of reconstruction and development.Madam Speaker, this old man – who was greatly honoured by the nation and parliament to be elected founding president of democratic South Africa – notes with immense satisfaction and pride today the persistence and strengthening of that spirit of generosity, magnanimity and confident hopefulness about the future of our nation.Merely observing this parliament inspires national pride and confidence. We, the people of South Africa, the Preamble to our Constitution states, believe that South Africa belongs to all who live in it, united in our diversity. The make-up of this Parliament confirms that the people of South Africa had spoken in all its diversity, asserting the strength of our unity in diversity.Voice of the peopleAllow us, Madam Speaker to congratulate you, the Chairperson of the National Council of Provinces and your deputies on your election to these important and prestigious positions in our democracy. Parliament is the voice of the people and you, the presiding officers, bear a heavy responsibility in ensuring that that voice is clearly heard in national affairs and that its role be protected and defended.Similarly, our congratulations to all the members of parliament in whom the nation has put its trust. Yours is the almost sacred duty to ensure government by the people under the Constitution.Madam Speaker, we also wish to extend congratulations to our president and to those that he has appointed as members of his national Cabinet and to the positions of provincial Premiers.I have said it so often, but want to repeat it here at what must certainly be the last time that parliament will bend its own rules to allow me to address it: no president or prime minister in the history of this country can claim to have done more for the people and the country than has been achieved by President Thabo Mbeki.National futureHe is a modest man and I know he would prefer that I do not sing his personal praises, but his achievement as president and national leader is the embodiment of what our nation is capable of. Public acknowledgement of his achievements is to affirm ourselves as a nation, to assert the confidence with which we face our national future and conduct ourselves on the international stage.Thank you, Mister President, for leading us with such vision and dedication to your task.Assuming, Madam Speaker, that Parliament is not cavalier about its own rules and that this is my last address to this House: what do I wish for our democracy in this second decade that we have entered?Let us never be unmindful of the terrible past from which we come – using that memory not as a means to keep us shackled to the past in a negative manner, but rather as a joyous reminder of how far we have come and how much we have achieved.The memory of a history of division and hate, injustice and suffering, inhumanity of person against person should inspire us to celebrate our own demonstration of the capacity of human beings to progress, to go forward, to improve, to do better.There are many theoretical debates about the meaning of democracy that I am not qualified to enter into. A guiding principle in our search for and establishment of a non-racial inclusive democracy in our country has been that there are good men and women to be found in all groups and from all sectors of society; and that in an open and free society those South Africans will come together to jointly and co-operatively realise the common good.Never give upMy wish is that South Africans never give up on the belief in goodness, that they cherish that faith in human beings as a cornerstone of our democracy.The first value mentioned under the founding principles of our Constitution is that of human dignity. We accord persons dignity by assuming that they are good, that they share the human qualities we ascribe to ourselves.Historical enemies succeeded in negotiating a peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy exactly because we were prepared to accept the inherent capacity for goodness in the other. We live in a world where there is enough reason for cynicism and despair.We watch as two of the leading democracies, two leading nations of the free world, get involved in a war that the United Nations did not sanction; we look on with horror as reports surface of terrible abuses against the dignity of human beings held captive by invading forces in their own country.Cynicism and despairWe see how the powerful countries – all of them democracies – manipulate multilateral bodies to the great disadvantage and suffering of the poorer developing nations.There is enough reason for cynicism and despair.But then we should take heart from our own experience and performance.Let us refrain from chauvinistic breast-beating; but let also not underrate what we have achieved in establishing a stable and progressive democracy where we take freedoms seriously; in building national unity in spite of decades and centuries of apartheid and colonial rule; in creating a culture in which we increasingly respect the dignity of all.InspirationIn a cynical world we have become an inspiration to many. We signal that good can be achieved amongst human beings who are prepared to trust, prepared to believe in the goodness of people.Poverty, unemployment, preventable disease and ill-health, and other forms of social deprivation continue to blot our landscape as we strive to give content to the democratic commitment of a better life for all. Nothing impairs the dignity of a person so much as not being able to find work and gainful employment. HIV/Aids continues to threaten our future in a particularly frightening manner.Our democracy must bring its material fruits to all, particularly the poor, marginalised and vulnerable. Our belief in the common good ultimately translates in to a deep concern for those that suffer want and deprivation of any kind.InclusivenessWe are inspired by the commitment that has emerged from all parties that have participated in the past elections. This parliament, leading into the second decade of democracy, promises to take seriously that contract with the people to improve their lives.We are impressed by the spirit of inclusiveness exuded by our legislature and our executive. We are warmed by the spirit of generosity that continues to characterise our nation and national efforts.Madam Speaker, we thank Parliament for this opportunity to greet the dawn of our second decade of democracy. We wish you well.May God protect our people.Nkosi sikelel’iAfrika. Morena boloka setjhaba sa heso.God seen Suid-Afrika. God bless South Africa.Mudzimu thatutshedza Afrika. Hosi katekisa Afrika.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

SA condemns violence in Egypt

first_img15 August 2013 South Africa has joined the international community in condemning the violence used by the Egyptian security forces to disperse pro-democracy demonstrators this week. Well over 300 people were killed and more than 3 000 others injured across Egypt on Wednesday in clashes between supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi and the security troops, after the latter dispersed two pro-Morsi sit-ins. Egypt’s Health Ministry said 43 policemen were also killed. But it remains difficult to dig out the real number of deaths and injuries due to conflicting sources as well as continuing clashes across the country. The Egyptian security forces started the evacuation operation at Rabaa al-Adawiya Square in Cairo’s Nasr City and Nahda Square in Giza. The pro-Morsi protesters had been sitting-in there for some 45 days. After the deadly clashes, the Egyptian interim presidency announced a nationwide state of emergency for one month, while the cabinet imposed a curfew on turmoil governorates including Cairo, Giza and Alexandria. On Thursday, Pretoria urged all parties in Egypt to exercise restraint and resolve their differences through dialogue, adding that the loss of life diminished the democratic aspirations expressed by millions of Egyptian voters last year. The South African government called on the interim authority “to end the bloody actions against its own people, and to conduct a credible and transparent judicial investigation against those who committed the massacres since 30 June 2013,” the Department of International Relations and Cooperation said in a statement on Thursday. It also called for the unconditional release all political detainees, and for the launch of “a genuine and comprehensive transition process so as to allow for the return to constitutional normalcy and democratic legitimacy”. Pretoria reiterated the importance of national reconciliation as paving the way for peace and stability in Egypt, saying that South Africa remained ready to share its own experiences and lessons in this regard. “An Egyptian-led, all-inclusive negotiated process remains the only option for Egypt to get out of the present impasse,” the department said. On Thursday, International Relations Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane discussed the situation in Egypt with her counterparts in the region on the sidelines of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Summit currently under way in Malawi. The department said they had agreed that peace and stability in Egypt was crucial to the North African region and the African continent as a whole. Source: SAnews.gov.za-Xinhualast_img read more

Five South Africans honoured in world rugby

first_img22 September 2015Five of South Africa’s rugby legends have been inducted into the World Rugby Hall of Fame. Springbok legends Naas Botha, Danie Gerber, Hennie Muller, Morne du Plessis and Joost van der Westhuizen were honoured at a special presentation held in the Spirit of Rugby Lounge at Wembly Stadium in London, England.The newest group of 25 players were being honoured for shaping the image of rugby and inspiring generations of fans. Between them they have three centuries of playing time and includes eighteen national team captains. The “voice of rugby”, commentator Bill McLaren and coaching guru Carwyn James were the only two not honoured for playing careers.To be eligible for induction into the Rugby Hall of Fame this years class – 7 Welshmen, 5 South Africans, 3 Englishmen, Scots and Irish and a pair of Wallabies and Frenchmen – had to follow certain criteria.– Retired from playing and coaching international Rugby for at least three years– Made an outstanding contribution to the Game of Rugby– Demonstrated Rugby’s core values are Passion, Integrity, Solidarity, Discipline and Respect both on and off the field.Joost van der Westhuizen was inducted into the Hall in 2007 in recognition of his playing career. Voted the greatest scrum half to have appeared at the Rugby World Cup – 1995, 1999 and 2003 – and remains the only Springbok to have captained both the 15 man national team and the Sevens.His 2015 induction recognizes the courage he has shown since being diagnosed with motor neuron disease in 2011. As the Hall of Fame site states, “Earlier this year a wheelchair-bound Van der Westhuizen defied the debilitating effects of the disease to revisit Ellis Park in Johannesburg to attend the 20th anniversary celebration of South Africa’s RWC 1995 win against the All Blacks, arguably his – and his country’s – finest hour.”Handing over the framed to those being honoured, or family members, World Rugby Chairman Bernard Lapasset explained that the Hall honoured those who had left an indelible mark on the game of rugby.They were all real legends who had shaped the image of rugby and inspired generations of fans. These men had contributed to the enjoyment fans experienced, “through feats on the field of play, displays of great character or through their tireless and inspirational work in driving forward our great game.Chris Rea and Pablo Mamone, who form the World Rugby Hall of Fame panel along with Henri Garcia, Nigel Starmer-Smith and secretary Chris Thau, were also in attendance in this special presentation held ahead of the eagerly-awaited RWC 2015 Pool C match between New Zealand and Argentina.The full list of inductees into the World Rugby Hall of Fame (in alphabetical order) is:Phil Bennett (Wales), Naas Botha (South Africa), Gordon Brown (Scotland), Marcel Communeau (France), Gerald Davies (Wales), Mervyn Davies (Wales), Danie Gerber (South Africa), Tim Horan (Australia), Andy Irvine (Scotland), Carwyn James (Wales), Barry John (Wales), Tom Kiernan (Ireland), Gwyn Nicholls (Wales), Basil Maclear (Ireland), Bill McLaren (Scotland), Edgar Mobbs (England), Hennie Muller (South Africa), Morne du Plessis (South Africa), Ronald Poulton-Palmer (England), Tom Richards (Australia), Jean-Pierre Rives (France), Fergus Slattery (Ireland), Wavell Wakefield (England), Joost van der Westhuizen (South Africa) and John Lewis Williams (Wales).Watch the Samoan rugby team honouring Joost Van der Westhuizen with a hymn Fa’afetai i le atua (Thank you, God, our Creator) sung in Brighton, England:For more information on the Hall of Fame visit, the site here.Source: News24 Wirelast_img read more