Avoiding Wildlife Encounters in Your Yard

first_img Homeowners should also limit places that could make attractive dens for wildlife by blocking access points under doorsteps, sheds and attics. People concerned about wildlife damaging property or threatening their safety or see an injured or diseased animal should contact their local office of the Department of Lands and Forestry. Contact information for offices can be found at http://www.novascotia.ca/natr/staffdir/offices.asp . To learn more about living with wildlife and other topics, visit http://novascotia.ca/natr/wildlife/living-with-wildlife/ . People can reduce the risks of wildlife encounters in their neighbourhoods by following advice from experts at the Department of Lands and Forestry. “Seeing animals in the wild can be a wonderful experience but it is also common to see wildlife in our communities and that can become a nuisance and possibly a risk to people and pets,” said director of wildlife Bob Petrie. “To avoid backyard encounters with bears, foxes, deer, coyotes and other wild animals, people should reduce food sources.” Pet food left outside can attract animals and bird feeders can support mice or raccoons which attract foxes and other predators. “Nova Scotia’s black bears, for example, are magnificent animals, but they are a healthy population of omnivores and it’s in their nature to eat a wide variety of food and repeatedly return to a property when they smell a food supply,” said Mr. Petrie. “It’s important to reduce food odours from compost bins, garbage containers, and barbeques, to avoid unnecessary conflict and protect the animals and people.” To avoid attracting bears and other wildlife to residential properties: store green compost bins and garbage containers in a shed until the morning of pickup turn garden compost piles often and add lime to reduce odour freeze odorous food waste, such as lobster shells and fish, and put them in the compost bin on collection day avoid using bird feeders from April to October burn off barbecue grills at high temperatures after every use and clean them often keep pet food bowls indoors pick fruit from trees as soon as it ripens last_img read more

Family holds out hope of finding Quebec teen who disappeared 10 years

first_imgMONTREAL — Just before 8 a.m. on the morning of Feb. 10, 2009, David Fortin asked his mother, Caroline Lachance, to drive him to school. After she said she couldn’t, the teen didn’t insist. Instead, he put on his warm red winter jacket and walked away from his home in Alma, 230 kilometres north of Quebec City, towards the bus stop that would bring him to school. He was never seen again.“I heard the door close and I saw he left,” Lachance said in a recent interview. “I noticed he was leaving five or 10 minutes earlier than usual, but I never thought it was the last time I’d see my son.”Next Sunday will mark exactly 10 years since the brown eyed, brown haired 14-year-old, who would today be 24, disappeared without a trace.Lachance and the boy’s father, Eric Fortin, have never stopped looking for their oldest son. His mother remains convinced that he fled the relentless bullying she said he suffered at school.“Beginning in elementary school he was a victim of bullying,” she said. “David didn’t talk, he didn’t even talk any more about what he was living at school.”“I knew it wasn’t going very well at school, but I never imagined I wouldn’t see him again, it was far from my thoughts.”An investigation was launched quickly, as soon as it became apparent that the teen hadn’t gotten on the bus or gone to school. As of today, it remains open and active, according to a provincial police spokeswoman.“There is still information coming in and we verify that information,” Sgt. Melanie Dumaresq said. “Even if it resembles information we’ve already received.”Dumaresq said the file is reviewed from time to time in order to see if there’s anything new to try, such as a new technology or technique that didn’t exist 10 years ago.But Claude Brodeur, an ex-investigator who spent 35 years on the force, said that after 10 years the best hope for solving the case is a tip from the public.Since the disappearance, police have received thousands of tips and sightings, many of which proved to be false.But Fortin’s mother said several people gave the same story: that David was seen heading southwest, through the towns of Metabetchouan and Lac-Bouchette, perhaps heading towards the sparsely-populated Mekinac region north of Trois-Rivieres, which is halfway between Montreal and Quebec City.While it’s impossible to verify the accounts, Lachance believes the description given by the witnesses match her son’s appearance. With no clear objective, she believes her son may have headed that way on a whim, “without knowing where to go.”Lachance said the years since her son’s disappearance have been marked by emotional turbulence. Each new tip would bring an “explosion of joy,” followed by crushing disappointment when it led nowhere.In June 2012, Lachance organized a party for her son’s 18th birthday, believing that he’d contact her once he reached adulthood and could no longer be sent to a group home.“That’s why we thought, ‘if he’s hiding somewhere, maybe he’ll come back,’” she said. But it was not to be.And four years after that, the Missing Children’s Network circulated an age-adjusted portrait, guessing what he could look like as a young man. Again, nothing.Despite the repeated dashed hopes, Lachance says nothing is worse than not knowing what happened to her son.The only thing she’s doing for the 10-year anniversary of her son’s disappearance is asking the public to circulate his photo one more time.“We’re not going to mark the event because for us, to mark something, it means it’s joyful,” she said. “What we want is that the planet knows that David hasn’t been found,” she said.Ugo Giguere, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Businesses must pay up to Rs 20 for Aadhaar services use UIDAI

first_imgNew Delhi: Business organisations using Aadhaar services will now have to pay Rs 20 for each customer verification and 50 paise for authentication of each transaction carried out by the entities, the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) said Thursday.”Aadhaar authentication services shall be charged at the rate of Rs 20 (including taxes) for each e-KYC transaction and Rs 0.50 (including taxes) for each Yes and No authentication transaction from requesting entities,” a notification by the UIDAI said. Also Read – Maruti cuts production for 8th straight month in SepThe gazette notification, the Aadhaar (Pricing of Aadhaar Authentication Services) Regulations 2019, however, exempts government entities and the Department of Posts from authentication transaction charges. “The entities have been incurring a cost of Rs 150-200 per KYC sans Aadhaar. They have been demanding to use Aadhaar-based authentication and KYC services on account of these being convenient to them and their customers and also the fact that they will save huge amount which they currently incur in doing KYC through traditional means such as paper, physical verification, etc,” an official source told PTI. Also Read – Ensure strict implementation on ban of import of e-cigarettes: revenue to CustomsThe UIDAI source said with a nominal cost for each eKYC transaction entities would still be saving on Know Your Customer (KYC) cost while serving people with ease. According to the notification, the entities shall be required to deposit the authentication transaction charges within 15 days of issuance of the concerned invoice based on the usage. The delay in payment beyond 15 days shall attract interest compounded at 1.5 per cent per month and discontinuation of authentication and e-KYC services. Sources said that if an existing requesting entity (except those exempt), continues to use Aadhaar authentication services beyond the date of publication of these Regulations, it shall be deemed to have agreed to the specified authentication charges. The source said that now as per the amendments made through the Aadhaar Ordinance, several entities may now become eligible to use Aadhaar authentication subject to their meeting security and other conditions as per the Aadhaar Act and related regulations. “Therefore, it is just, fair and reasonable that such entities should contribute to meet expenses nominally which are incurred by UIDAI in providing these services,” the source said. The notification says that the scheduled commercial banks engaged in providing Aadhaar enrolment and update facilities in accordance with its gazette notification issued in July 2017 shall be exempt from authentication transaction charges. However, such banks, which fall short of the Aadhaar enrolment and update targets, as communicated from time to time, will be charged in proportion to the shortfall in achieving the target. UIDAI sources said that the above charges shall be in addition to the licence fees and financial disincentives, as applicable. The details of the transaction error codes and its charges shall be issued separately. The official said that in case a requesting entity does not wish to pay authentication transaction charges, it shall discontinue the use of Aadhaar authentication services and intimate its decision to the UIDAI immediately and surrender its access to the authentication facilities “However, the transaction charges as applicable till the date of de-activation of access to authentication services shall have to be paid,” the source said. On Wednesday, the Telangana government set up a Special Investigation Team (SIT) to probe the alleged data theft case involving an IT firm here even as a Look out Circular (LOC) has been issued against the owner of the company. The nine-member Special Investigation Team (SIT) was constituted as it was necessary for the probe which required expertise in cyber crime and extended to several places other than Cyberabad Commissionerate limits, official sources said. The team would undertake a thorough investigation in all aspects of the case in an expeditious, effective, professional and fair manner for bringing out all facts and circumstances leading to commission of crime, they said. The SIT shall immediately take over the investigation of the case registered at Madhapur police station and all other related cases registered in Telangana, they added. Police said an LOC was issued against Ashok, CEO of ‘IT Grids India Pvt Ltd,’ by the Ministry of Home Affairs on a request from Cyberabad Police, to prevent him from fleeing the country. The IT firm has been accused of ‘theft of data’ of voters through “Seva Mitra” mobile app, used by the TDP in Andhra Pradesh. Four teams have been formed to nab Ashok, after he “failed” to appear before the police despite being summoned as part of the investigation in the case. The Cyberabad police had on March 2 registered a case against the company and conducted searches at its office here based on a complaint by a data analyst. The complainant, a data analyst, had alleged that the company misused personal information and sensitive data of voters in Andhra Pradesh through ‘Seva Mitra’ mobile app used by the ruling Telugu Desam Party. Preliminary investigation revealed that the company got illegal access to various personal and sensitive data of individuals such as Aadhaar, electoral roll, government schemes and voters information related to various political parties, which can be misused for illegal purposes. “LOC has been issued (against Ashok) and all airports have been alerted,” Cyberabad Police Commissioner V C Sajjanar said. A look out notice is sent to immigration authorities to ensure that any accused person is detained and handed over to the prosecuting agency. The senior police official said they were awaiting a response from Amazon Web Services and Google Play Store with whom the database is said to have been stored, to its notice seeking information. He further said they were in the process of writing to the Andhra Pradesh governemnt, Unique Identification Authority of India, Election Commission and Registrar of Companies for more details in this regard. Meanwhile, a probe by the Hyderabad police into the case registered by it against the company revealed that the names of four people,originally from Andhra Pradesh but staying here, were missing from the voters list. The complainant in this case had alleged that the firm had through a survey collected the information and deleted names of individuals after obtaining their political preferences.last_img read more

GM plant closings will hit parts suppliers far and wide

TOLEDO, Ohio — The sting from a major restructuring at General Motors and its planned closings of five North American factories in the coming months is putting thousands of jobs at auto parts suppliers at stake, as well.While GM expects nearly all its U.S. blue-collar workers whose jobs are being eliminated to have an opportunity at relocating to factories that are adding jobs, that won’t be the case for many in the supply chain who make parts, drive trucks, work in warehouses and keep GM’s plants operating.For most of them, there is no safety net.“There’s nowhere to transfer. They’ve got nowhere to go. They’re just out of work,” said Dave Green, a union leader near Youngstown where GM in early March plans to shut down its factory that makes the Chevrolet Cruze compact car.GM’s labour agreements guarantee its workers transfer rights and relocation money, but that’s not true for the wide majority of suppliers, even where the workers are represented by unions.“We’ve been lost in the shuffle,” said Brian Shina, who lost his supplier plant job when GM cut a shift at its Lordstown factory in May, months before announcing plans to close it. “We don’t have any leverage here.”The dominoes already are starting to fall. A plant that makes seats for the Cruze and another business that does logistics and warehousing work for GM in Ohio will close in March, too. Just three years ago, those two had a combined 800 workers.Green has compiled a list of more than 50 other businesses whose work is tied to the Ohio assembly plant. But it’s difficult to know how many could be forced to cut jobs because many do work for other auto plants and industries.Despite varying estimates, some economists project that for every auto plant job that is lost, three or four additional positions are eliminated. Research shows that auto plants, and manufacturing in general, create more spinoff jobs than other industries.“That’s the bigger part of this,” said Green, who plans on attending President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address Tuesday at the invitation of Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan, whose district includes the plant.Trump, who has promised to revive manufacturing in the Midwest, has been highly critical of GM’s announcement, threatening that his administration was looking at cutting GM subsidies, including for electric cars. It’s an especially thorny issue for the president, who won over a surprising number of Democratic-leaning union workers during his first campaign.There’s still a chance some of the factories targeted by GM could be revived during upcoming contract negotiations with the United Auto Workers union, which has promised to fight the closures. Those include assembly plants in Detroit and Oshawa, Ontario, and transmission plants in Warren, Michigan, and near Baltimore.Suppliers closest to factories that end up shutting down tend to be hit hardest because they’re usually more reliant on those plants than those farther removed with a broader customer base, said Albert J. Sumell, an economics professor at Youngstown State University.Workers at a parts plant in Whitby, Ontario, walked off the job in January to protest GM’s decision to shutter its Canadian plant while another nearby supplier plant announced it will be forced to close.Many of the parts that flow into the transmission plant near Baltimore come from other states, including South Carolina and Tennessee, and some are delivered from Mexico and Canada, said Guy White, a UAW shop chairman in Maryland.“There’s all sorts of suppliers. It’s huge,” he said. “We get stuff from all over the world.”Other jobs that are directly tied to the plant are more likely to be in jeopardy, including those who supply its machines or sort parts, White said.Those who study the auto supply industry say it’s too early to know the full impact of GM’s transformation away from cars to focus on trucks, SUVs, and electric and autonomous vehicles.Some suppliers expect to withstand the potential losses from GM because they have made moves to diversify their customer base in the years since the Great Recession rocked the auto industry.Jamestown Industries, a small operation that supplies front and rear bumper covers for the Cruze, hopes its efforts to secure new business will allow its Youngstown plant to keep going.The idea is to add work in warehousing, logistics, and packaging outside of the automotive industry, said Lawrence Long, the company’s vice-president of development.But the plant is down from three shifts to one and now is poised to lose its biggest customer. Melissa Green, who has worked there 14 years, isn’t optimistic and making plans to switch to a career in nursing.She’ll be able to go to school for free through a state program that assists laid-off workers but still will need another job once her unemployment benefits run out.What also worries her is what will happen to the older workers who are just shy of retirement age.“A lot of them don’t know what they’re going to do,” she said. “Hopefully they can find something because they have to survive.”John Seewer, The Associated Press read more

Two killed as rocks fall on them while clearing land

Two people were killed as rocks fell on them while clearing land in the Nuwara Eliya area, the police said.The police said that a 70 year old man and his 36 year old son were killed in the accident.

Yellens Fed will face tests as it scales back bond purchases aimed

Yellen’s Fed will face tests as it scales back bond purchases aimed at boosting economy FILE – In this Nov. 14, 2013 file photo, Janet Yellen, of California, smiles as she is introduced as being the first female to be nominated as Federal Reserve Board chair, prior to testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate is ready to approve Yellen’s nomination to become the first woman to lead the Federal Reserve in its century-long history. Yellen is a long-time advocate of fighting unemployment and a backer of the central bank’s recent efforts to spur the economy with low interest rates and massive bond purchases. She was expected to win easy approval in Monday’s vote. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File) WASHINGTON – Janet Yellen will take the helm of a Federal Reserve facing a significantly different economic landscape from the one that dominated Ben Bernanke’s tenure as chairman, confronting her with different decisions as well.Bernanke’s eight years leading the Fed were largely consumed with the Great Recession and his efforts to cure it by pushing down interest rates and pumping cash into the economy. Many economists think Yellen’s big challenge will be deciding how to ease off some of those very policies, which Bernanke took with Yellen’s support.“Circumstances may demand more rapid tightening than people are expecting,” said Bill Cheney, chief economist for John Hancock Financial Services, who envisions a growing economy this year. He contrasted that with Bernanke, who he said had to decide “when to step on the gas pedal and how hard” as the economy recovered weakly from the recession.The Senate confirmed Yellen, a long-time Fed official and economist at the University of California at Berkeley, by a 56-26 vote Monday. Supporting her were all 45 voting Democrats and 11 Republicans, while all opposing votes came from the GOP. Many senators missed the vote because frigid weather cancelled numerous airline flights.Yellen begins her four-year term Feb. 1, when Bernanke steps down. She has been Fed vice chair since 2010.Nominated by President Barack Obama to the top job in October, Yellen comes to the post after a career in which she has focused in part on unemployment and its causes. Obama and congressional Democrats lauded her concerns for workers Monday.In a written statement, Obama said Yellen’s approval means “the American people will have a fierce champion who understands that the ultimate goal of economic and financial policymaking is to improve the lives, jobs and standard of living of American workers and their families.”Many Republicans were less enthusiastic. Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, warned that a continuation of the Fed’s easy money policies “risks fueling an economic bubble and even hyper-inflation,” which he said could cause “real and lasting damage to our economy.”House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, announced that he will hold hearings on the Fed’s bond buying program and on the “potential unintended consequences” of the Volcker rule. That rule, approved by the Fed and other agencies, is aimed at preventing many large banks from trading for their own profit in hopes of preventing practices that helped lead to the 2008 financial meltdown.Lobbyists for the banking and financial services sectors issued statements pledging to work with Yellen. Both industries have led a fight to water down restrictions imposed by Obama’s 2010 law overhauling how the nation’s financial system is regulated.The Fed announced in December that the labour market has improved enough that it will begin reducing its $85 billion in monthly bond purchases, starting with a $10 billion reduction this month. It has pushed that money into the economy to try keeping long-term interest rates low.But Yellen will face questions about how to manage that process. Moving too fast could spook financial markets and shove interest rates higher, while withdrawing the bonds too slowly could risk creating bubbles — that might burst — in real estate, the stock market or other assets.The bond purchases have ballooned the Fed’s holdings over $4 trillion. That leaves Yellen with decisions about how to wind down the central bank’s balance sheet to a smaller, more normal level without destabilizing financial markets used to the huge cash infusions.Yellen also will have to decide when and how to ease off short-term interest rates, which the Fed has kept near zero since December 2008. To assure investors that those rates won’t precipitously rise, the Fed has repeatedly issued statements saying that policy will continue.Last month, the Fed said the low rates will continue “well past” when the unemployment rates falls to 6.5 per cent. Unemployment was 7 per cent in November and many economists think the low interest rates will last until late 2015.Yellen will also guide the Fed at a time when some Republicans say the central bank needs to be more accountable to Congress. Hensarling has already said his committee will spend a year reviewing Fed operations.Last week, Bernanke voiced concerns about legislation giving the Government Accountability Office, Congress’ auditing arm, more power to examine how the Fed makes interest rate decisions. Bernanke said such legislation would make it harder to assure markets that its decisions aren’t influenced by political pressure. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by Alan Fram And Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Press Posted Jan 6, 2014 9:15 pm MDT read more

Shareholders vote in favour of Enbridges 37B Spectra Energy takeover

CALGARY – Shareholders have voted in favour of Enbridge’s $37-billion takeover of Spectra Energy in what will be the largest acquisition of a foreign company in Canadian history.The all-stock deal, if approved by regulators, will bring together Enbridge’s extensive oil-focused pipeline portfolio with Spectra’s sizable natural gas pipelines and infrastructure to form a company that was projected to have a combined value of $165 billion when it was announced in September.Enbridge shareholders voted more than 99 per cent in favour of the deal, while Spectra shareholders at a special meeting voted 98 per cent in favour of the deal.Al Monaco, chief executive of Enbridge, said the company continues to work on regulatory approvals and expects the deal to close in the first quarter of next year.Enbridge says the combined company will have a $74-billion inventory of projects, including the $7.5-billion Line 3 Replacement Project the federal government approved in early December.Under the terms of the deal, Spectra shareholders will receive 0.984 Enbridge shares for each common Spectra share they own, with Enbridge shareholders expected to own 57 per cent of the combined company and Spectra shareholders the rest. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Shareholders vote in favour of Enbridge’s $37B Spectra Energy takeover by The Canadian Press Posted Dec 15, 2016 4:15 pm MDT read more

Football Ohio State finds offensive line success in time for playoff push

Ohio State redshirt senior offensive lineman Demetrius Knox (78) makes an “H” as he is taken off the field in the second half of the game against Michigan on Nov. 24. Ohio State won 62-39. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorOhio State proved plenty in its dominating 62-39 victory against Michigan, including the ability to play consistently well on both sides of the ball against a team ranked in the top 25 in scoring offense and defense.For the offense, it wasn’t the usual successful game. It wasn’t just redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins throwing the lights out on his own.Against Michigan, and Maryland the week prior, the Buckeyes found a more complete offense, allowing Haskins to continue to put up big numbers while the run game gained the consistency it lacked in the first half of the season.The new and improved offense starts with the new and improved play on the offensive line.“I have seen the consistency,” head coach Urban Meyer said. “We’ve all seen consistency start — I can’t give you the exact time, but they’re playing very well right now.”Haskins has thrown for more than 395 yards and the team has run for at least 170 yards and 4.8 yards per carry, allowing only a single sack in the past two games combined.Both Maryland and Michigan ranked in the top 20 in passing defense coming into the matchup, and the Wolverines had the No. 1 defense in the NCAA.Meyer said the offensive line’s performance against Michigan “was one of the best” he has seen from the group all season.After giving up zero sacks to Michigan and becoming a key contributor to the statement win the Buckeyes needed, they lost a key member late in the fourth quarter when the game was all but over.Redshirt senior guard Demetrius Knox went down with a foot injury that Meyer described as a “Lisfranc issue.” Knox announced Monday on Twitter that his Ohio State career was over after starting 20 total games for the Buckeyes.“He’s done so much for this team in his career here, so it’s a tough loss for us,” Meyer said. “We’ve got to regroup and put together that position.”Taking Knox’s place will be redshirt freshman guard Wyatt Davis, Meyer said. Davis, a former five-star recruit, has appeared in five games this season.Meyer said Davis’ recruitment was “one of the most enjoyable recruiting experiences” he’s ever had, and the redshirt freshman has been close to getting his chance for weeks.“He’s a rugged guy, and he’s been scratching and clawing for playing time ever since probably five, six weeks ago, and has been close,” Meyer said. “We didn’t want to disrupt the flow of the five guys in there.”Davis no longer needs to scratch and claw his way to the job. He has it. But he gets the starting job following the offensive line’s best performance yet and Ohio State’s most consistently impressive game in every facet of the field.Davis enters as the player disrupting the consistency — a change in the depth chart that could disrupt an Ohio State team finally looking like one that can make a run for the College Football Playoff.Meyer said all five starting members of the offensive line were champions against the Wolverines.Against No. 19 Northwestern, which has another top 30 scoring defense, Davis will need to prove himself able of taking over the spot Knox leaves behind, right at the time Ohio State’s offensive line finally turned the corner it had been searching for. read more

Human swan describes navigating thunderstorms and battling temperatures of 25C during 4500mile

first_imgMs Dench, who works at Slimbridge Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust, in Gloucestershire, set off on her 10-week mission to track the annual migration of Bewick swans at the beginning of September.She flew by paramotor – paragliding with a propeller strapped to her back – to get as close as possible to flying as swans do. She’s done it! Sacha has become the 1st woman to cross the Channel by #paramotor. Welcome home #FlightOfTheSwans! pic.twitter.com/9EIMY1Ynmo— WWT (@WWTworldwide) December 5, 2016 Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The final leg of Dench’s journey is to London, where she will row down the Thames in a dragon boat and deliver a petition to government.The petition is calling for action to restore wetlands, ensure the safe positioning of wind turbines and power cables and tackle illegal hunting.She said: “The expedition has been huge and so brilliant – now we need to make sure we use the information to make practical changes. It’s crucial that we act now before it’s too late.” Sacha Dench’s journey by paramotor took her through landscapes where she had to navigate wind farms and tall buildingsCredit:WWT/PA Taking a moment during this exciting flight to remember and thank all those that have made it possible, like Brian Middleton, our mechanic. pic.twitter.com/EXZYemfIz9— Flight Of The Swans (@WWTSwanFlight) December 5, 2016 “We’ve had GPS collars on some of the birds and I’ve been following five in particular over this trip – to see how many other birds they fly with, where they stop, which areas they avoid and why. We’ve built up a huge amount of data we just didn’t have before.”In 1995 there were around 29,000 Bewick swans in Europe but this number fell to 18,100 by 2010 and is continuing to decline.Shooting is a big issue –  around a quarter of the swans landing at the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust have shotgun pellets buried in their skin.But Sara said her expedition has taught her that “we can get through to hunters and recruit help from people on the ground”.“The people I had traditionally thought of as enemies of conservation are the ones I have had the most productive meetings with. Battle lines were dropped and we talked practically about certain issues and found common ground.” Help Sacha save the Bewick’s and make every km of her epic journey count by signing our petition: https://t.co/efBaFpitY0 pic.twitter.com/jFS4JM9BaK— Flight Of The Swans (@WWTSwanFlight) November 14, 2016 Sacha Denchcenter_img Sacha Dench used just a parachute wing and a small propeller engineCredit:WWT/PA She described a day when she stopped in a remote Russian town and met some of the schoolchildren who are sent out to shoot migrating birds for food at a young age.“They were riveted by how conservation and research works,” she said. “They had no idea where the swans went.”The expedition was nearly stopped short when Ms Dench dislocated her kneecap trying to take off from St Petersburg after stumbling on uneven ground.Her team had to adapt her paramotor with wheels so she could launch herself without putting pressure on her “excruciatingly painful” knee.But she said managing sickness, exhaustion and cold “definitely made me a better pilot than I was before”.   Her journey, dubbed Flight of the Swans, was an attempt to learn more about why the numbers of birds have halved in the last 20 years.“We have learned a huge amount,” Sara said after landing in Kent today. Sacha Dench She’s flown 4,500 miles, navigated the desolate expanse of the Russian arctic, endured a dislocated kneecap and become the first woman ever to cross the English channel in a motorised paraglider.But 41-year-old conservationist Sara Dench said the most frightening part of her journey as a “human swan” was enduring temperatures of -25C and flying through snow and thunderstorms. “The expedition wouldn’t have been possible if we hadn’t pushed the limit in terms of flying.”And while there have been difficult and frightening moments, Dench said crossing the Channel and seeing the “shining white cliffs of Dover” was a “lovely call to home”.“This part of the flight involved a lot of concentration as it’s the only area of my journey where if I had failed, I would have landed in water. So I had to make sure my escape route was planned and practised. But now that I’ve done it, I would love to go back and do it again. It’s such a beautiful stretch of water and it’s so great to be the first woman ever to cross the Channel in such a way.” “At one point I just collapsed in tears,” she said. “I cried for ages in pain because the batteries had run out in my heated gloves.“But the scariest moment was flying in between thunderstorms and I realised, looking down, that the options to land were not good.“I could see the Russian tundra and decided it was safer to carry on in those conditions than try and find a landing space in a tree.”last_img read more

POLL Who is your Premier League Player of the Season so far

first_img Poll Results: Luis Suarez (3283) Gareth Bale (2644) Robin van Persie (993) AFTER GARETH BALE’S incredible display against West Ham last Monday, some critics began to consider him a contender for the Premier League Player of the Season award.However today, Luis Suarez reaffirmed his credentials with a clinical hat-trick in Liverpool’s comfortable victory over Wigan.Robin van Persie, meanwhile, though he perhaps hasn’t been as prominent as Bale and Suarez of late, has continually dazzled with his performances since joining Manchester United.Therefore, we’re asking: who deserves to be given the top gong come awards season?Van Persie’s goals have earned his team more points than any other player in the league, so does he deserve to triumph on that basis?Bale, on the other hand, has racked up the goals, despite the ostensible disadvantage of invariably playing in a less advanced role than Suarez and RVP.Or maybe you think Suarez is the worthy winner, given that he currently has more goals than any other Premier League player this season?Let us know by voting and commenting below.Who is your Player of the Year so far? Other (1008) Robin van PersieLuis SuarezGareth BaleOtherVoteStokes finds the net as Celtic stay on course for domestic doubleVIDEO: Ramos heads Real Madrid to another Clasico victory>last_img read more

Tight at the top Only 3pc separates three parties in latest poll

first_imgFINE GAEL remains Ireland’s most popular political party, according to the latest opinion poll of voter intentions – but there is just three per cent between the top three parties.The Millward Brown poll published in this morning’s Sunday Independent shows that if a general election was to be held tomorrow, Fine Gael would receive 24 per cent of the vote – down one point from the last poll by the same company.Fianna Fáil – which had topped the last Millward Brown poll – falls back to second place, dropping four points to 23 per cent, just one point behind its rival.Sinn Féin’s strong performances in recent polls continue; it is up one point to 21 per cent, and is now just three per cent behind the top party.Labour, meanwhile, continues its poor form and falls two points to 11 per cent.Independent candidates and those of other parties command the support of the remaining 22 per cent of voters.The poll took responses from 983 people – leaving a margin of error of 3 per cent, meaning the gap between top three parties could be even closer.However, the poll also found that 28 per cent of people had not decided on how they would vote – indicating that there is still plenty of room for parties to try and win extra support.In an interview with TheJournal.ie, Sinn Féin president Gerry Adams insisted he would lead his party into the next election – saying senior figures like he and Martin McGuinness wanted to continue leading the party through the ‘transition’ that has brought it to power in Northern Ireland.Read: Gerry Adams: ‘I’ll certainly lead Sinn Féin into the next election’Poll: Which party leader should be Taoiseach after the next election?last_img read more

Strike looms in ambulance service over unsuitable posts

first_imgSIPTU MEMBERS OF the HSE’s ambulance service are to ballot for industrial action over a failure to implement staff redeployment recommendations made by the Labour Court.The recommendations said that if a post was not suitable for a person in the ambulance service, they can be transferred to the wider public service.SIPTU organiser Paul Bell said there are currently 103 people who are “not in the right job right now” – some waiting to be redeployed for over a year. The recommendations were made under the terms of the Haddington Road Agreement, which made a staff reshuffle necessary as part of the restructuring of services in the National Ambulance Service.Addressing a meeting in Liberty Hall of shop stewards and activists in the HSE today, Bell said the union had been given “no alternative” but to ballot workers. The ballot will include advanced paramedics, emergency medical technicians, controllers and patient transport service professionals.If workers vote to strike, this would be the first strike under the Haddington Road Agreement. The ballot will commence on 27 June and will be completed by three weeks.Read: “Impossible response times” being demanded from paramedics>Read: Ambulances spent 8,000 hours parked outside hospitals in April>last_img read more

Complaints against Vodafone Dublin Airport and a psychic healer upheld

first_imgLAST MONTH, THE Advertising Standards Agency of Ireland (ASAI) dealt with 13 complaints about alleged breaches of advertising codes.The complaints related to honesty or truthfulness, principles and health and beauty. Twelve of the complaints were upheld and one was not.Ten of the complaints upheld had been made by consumers and most accused the advertisements of being misleading.Among them was a complaint about ‘psychic healer’ Donald Moore whose advertisement claimed he could help with “asthma arthritis, depression, miscarriage, smoking/weight control, ME tumours, anxiety, emotional upset, vertigo, insomnia, IBS, self harm etc.”The ASAI said the advertiser failed to respond to the complaint and noted that this was not the first instance of this style of advertising by Moore. It cited a code section that says advertising must not offer any product or treatment for serious or prolonged ailments for for conditions requiring the attention of a registered practitioner.Terms and conditionsA complaint against Vodafone stated that the customer was not aware that an offer which included a new phone every year would automatically result in a further 24-month contract. Vodafone argued that the advertisement clearly highlighted that each contract was subject to terms and conditions and these included a mention of re-entering a 24-month contract.However, the ASAI said it that terms and conditions should be clearly linked to from an offer so that they are easily found by customers and upheld the complaint.Dublin Airport Authority also had to answer for an advertisement it ran offering a free cup of coffee and fast track through security for those booking the short-term car park. The terms and conditions specified that bookings had to be made midweek and online and the ASAI said these factors should have been mentioned in the main copy of the radio advertisement.Other complaints included one against a dating website over its ‘free’ membership policy, a complaint about an Eircom bundle and one about a Danone Actimel ad which said your immune system needs a healthy breakfast.A full list of complaints can be found on the ASAI website. Read: Ads in breach: Small print from Three, bad coverage from eMobile, indecency from The Wright Venue>Read: Kellogg’s agree to axe music from new ad after Kodaline controversy>last_img read more

Supermans Red Trunks Return in Action Comics 1000

first_img Superman’s iconic red trunks disappeared during DC Comics’ New 52 initiative and remained missing when the company launched Rebirth. Now, for Action Comics‘ landmark 1000th issue, DC is redesigning the Kryptonian’s costume to incorporate new and classic elements. One of these additions are the character’s red trunks.First revealed by Entertainment Weekly, the cover to Action Comics #1000 shows Superman in all of his red trunk-y glory. The image was illustrated by Jim Lee, Scott Williams, and Alex Sinclair. Artist Jim Lee was actually the man who removed Big Blue’s trunks for New 52, so it is somewhat fitting that he’s the one to bring them back. The new costume also resurrects the yellow belt, which went missing along with the red trunks. The blue metallic cuff from DC Rebirth and the DCEU films have been incorporated as well.“Action Comics #1000 represents a watershed moment in the history of not just comic books, but entertainment, literature, and pop culture,” said Jim Lee in a statement. “There’s no better way to celebrate Superman’s enduring popularity than to give him a look that combines some new accents with the most iconic feature of his classic design.”Given its importance, Action Comics #1000 will be unlike any other anniversary comic out there. Expect a variety of stories from some of the industry’s biggest names. The most notable one is long-time Marvel Comics writer, Brian Michael Bendis, who will pen his first Superman story. Marv Wolfman, who wrote the classic Crisis on Infinite Earths, is doing a brand-new tale based on unpublished art from legendary Superman artist Curt Swan. Superman movie director Richard Donner is once again teaming up with writer Geoff Johns to write a story as well.Current Superman writers Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason along with current Action Comics writer Dan Jurgens are also joining the festivities. Other contributors include: Paul Dini with José Luis García-López; Tom King with Clay Mann and Jordie Bellaire; Brad Meltzer with John Cassaday and Laura Martin; Louise Simonson with Jerry Ordway; Scott Snyder with Tim Sale and several more.Action Comics #1000 releases on April 18. Syfy Axes ‘Krypton’ Superhero Series After 2 SeasonsThe Greatest Romances in Comic Book History Stay on targetcenter_img Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more

CARPHA launches regional system for Member States to report substandard and falsified

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TrinidadandTobago, February 2, 2018 – Port of Spain – The health of the Caribbean people can be at risk if medicines are not safe, effective and of good quality.   Medicines safety and monitoring systems are often limited in the Region, and there has been a call for regional pooling of resources, sharing of information, and coordination of activities, that can lead to stronger systems.Recently, the Caribbean Regulatory System (CRS) launched VigiCarib, a voluntary regional system for CARICOM states to report adverse drug reactions (ADRs), suspected substandard and falsified products.   The program will help to protect patients and bolster their confidence in health care, as well as send a signal to manufacturers and distributors that their products are being monitored for safety and quality.VigiCarib, endorsed by CARICOM Ministers of Health allows health professionals, members of the public, and other stakeholders to report to the CRS for regulatory analysis and action. Through this system, CRS may share information about problematic products with CARICOM states, pool data to identify signals, and make recommendations to governments about regulatory actions.The CRS is an initiative of CARICOM and is managed as a regulatory unit by the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA), in close partnership with the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO).  For more information about the CRS and VigiCarib visit http://carpha.org/What-We-Do/Laboratory-Services-and-Networks/CRSRelease: CARPHA Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

Baltimore Musical Artist Blaqstarr Continues Evolution with Trinity Vol 15

first_imgBaltimore artist Blaqstarr says his latest album, “Trinity Vol 1.5,” is the culmination of everything he has done so far, from his beginnings as a DJ-turned Baltimore club producer to his latest evolution which includes musical instruments such as the guitar, drums and keyboard.For portions of his new album, the artist reworked old music that fans may not have heard before but that inspired him, and remixed it to make it feel modern and new.“It gives the past, present, future,” he said. “Not just my sound, but Baltimore sound.”Blaqstarr, also known as Charles Village resident Jamal Loving, has earned a huge following all over the globe, and has worked with singer M.I.A. and popular producer Diplo.“I started DJ-ing at 14, before that I was singing on the phone to girls,” he said. From there he went from working house parties, to small lounges, to big clubs and now performing internationally.His first big break came when he made CDs of his mixes and began selling them. Listeners called local radio stations and requested them, but he said radio DJ’s had no idea who he was.“I was a mystery for a good three years,” he said.Soon, popular 92Q DJ K-Swift got a chance to listen and learn about his music, and began playing it on the air.“She told me, ‘anything you make give it to me, I love it,’” he said.Blaqstarr said his current music reflects the fact that he’s entering a new phase of his career. He is currently releasing music without a record label, a move he said gives him the freedom to think outside the box. Another new development in his life is his eight-month-old daughter.“I understand myself a lot more,” he said, adding that his music is always in his head and his daughter likes to dance and sing, proving that it lives inside her, too.He also says he has learned to let go of expectations.“Before when I first started going to the studio, I’d be like, ‘let’s go in the studio and make a song about love, or let’s make a song about partying,’” Blaqstarr said. “Those were the most difficult. I had an expectation, almost like a limit in a way.”The artist said it’s still not clear how his new freedom will affect his creative process.“I really don’t know but I know it will be great,” he said. “I can go in the session and make three songs that way. My music will be great and continue to be greater and I’m going to continue to stay open.”Of all the places he has traveled to perform, he said Copenhagen, Denmark is one of his favorites. He was well-received by crowds at his shows, and a DJ he met who had moved there from Baltimore painted an idyllic picture of the Danish city as a place with free healthcare and a low crime rate.Locally, Blaqqstar said he can perform anywhere in town as long as the crowd is open and receptive. Specifically, he loves Paradox—he got his start there and likes to stop in every once in a while.“I just recently DJ’d there about two or three weeks ago. It brought back so many memories,” he said. “I get real emotional every time I go to Paradox. One half of me is in the zone, one half feels like when you visit your high school.”Blaqstarr’s new album is available on iTunes for $4.95last_img read more

BDC ESTABLISHES THE BALTIMORE BUSINESS RECOVERY FUND

first_imgBALTIMORE (May 13, 2015) – The Baltimore Development Corporation (BDC) has established the Baltimore Business Recovery Fund (BBR Fund) to aid the many businesses, which experienced property damage and/or inventory loss during the unrest.  The goal is to raise $15 million, which will be used to fund the Baltimore Business Recovery loan program.  The BBR Fund was kicked off at the Greater Baltimore Committee’s annual meeting with a text pledging campaign that resulted in more than $200K committed to help the affected businesses.The BBR Fund will be used to make zero interest loans up to $35,000 to the affected businesses.  These loans may be convertible into grants if certain benchmarks are met.  The loans will be made available when enough funds have been raised.  Donations to the Baltimore Business Recovery Fund are tax deductible.  Please visit www.BaltimoreDevelopment/Donations to make a contribution.“As Baltimore works harder to foster economic inclusion and create jobs, the health of the City’s economy is vital,” said William H. Cole, president and CEO of the Baltimore Development Corporation.  “Small businesses play a crucial role in not only strengthening the economy, but also serve a strong need in the neighborhoods in which they operate.”To date, approximately 350 businesses were affected and many have limited coverage or no insurance, very often as a result of loss of coverage. Some businesses were so severely damaged that they still remain closed and their owners left with no source of income.The BDC in coordination with the City of Baltimore and other local, state and federal agencies is leading the rebuilding efforts has been reaching out to these businesses to catalogue the extent of the damage and determine what resources may be needed to get them back on their feet.  Businesses that suffered property damage or inventory loss can contact the BDC through www.BaltimoreBusinessRecovery.org.last_img read more

Chemists show that sodium can be safely used for crosscoupling reactions

first_img Citation: Chemists show that sodium can be safely used for cross-coupling reactions (2019, March 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-chemists-sodium-safely-cross-coupling-reactions.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Preparation of organometallic compounds and the subsequent cross-coupling reactions. a, Transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions. b, Common methods for preparation of organozinc and organoboron compounds from organolithium and organomagnesium compounds. c, This report: preparation of organozinc and organoboron compounds from organosodium compounds and the subsequent cross-coupling reactions. Ar, aryl. Credit: Nature Catalysis (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41929-019-0250-6 Explore further Boosting solid state chemical reactions © 2019 Science X Networkcenter_img More information: Sobi Asako et al. Organosodium compounds for catalytic cross-coupling, Nature Catalysis (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41929-019-0250-6 A trio of chemists at Okayama University has published a paper in the journal Nature Catalysis outlining the manner in which sodium can be safely used for cross-coupling reactions. In their paper, Sobi Asako, Hirotaka Nakajima and Kazuhiko Takai describe relatively safe ways to produce organosodium molecules. Journal information: Nature Catalysis In chemistry, cross-coupling reactions join two organic compounds using a metal as a catalyst. One metal commonly used for such reactions is lithium, which is notably rare. Chemists know sodium is a possible catalyst, and is a far more common element—the researchers point out that it is the most abundant alkali metal in both the Earth’s crust and in the ocean. But chemists also know that using sodium in such reactions is dangerous—the slightest mistake can result in a fire. A student at UCLA died from severe burns, for example, in 2008, when a syringe malfunction caused a fire. In their paper, Asako, Nakajima and Takai argue that there are safer ways to use sodium and outline a method.The researchers note that they began rethinking the idea of using sodium in cross-coupling reactions at the urging of a company that makes dispersions using sodium particles. They wanted to know it if might be possible to use sodium-in-paraffin oil as part of their work. The researchers thought it might be possible because some chemists have been converting aryl chlorides into arylsodiums through the use of sodium dispersions for many years. The researchers used a similar approach, creating arylsodiums under inert atmospheres and then using them right away to instigate other transformations. They report that doing so showed that arylsodiums could be created easily and relatively safely using aryl chlorides, which could then be used for cross-coupling reactions. They demonstrated the possibility by performing transmetallations to zinc and then using the result to carry out Negishi and Suzuki–Miyaura cross-couplings. The researchers acknowledge that the scope of applications is currently limited, but suggest there might be ways to overcome roadblocks. But they also suggest that other researchers might want to replicate their work as part of efforts to reduce the use of lithium in commercial applications.last_img read more

Sectra Enterprise Image Management Solutions

first_img CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiation Oncology View all 91 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Information Technology View all 220 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Sectra Enterprise Image Management SolutionsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:29Loaded: 3.01%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:29 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Find more SCCT news and videoscenter_img Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Sectra provides industry-leading enterprise image management solutions comprising PACS for radiology, cardiology, and pathology, VNA and Cross Enterprise Workflow. Through 25 years of innovation and 1,700 installations, our experience in radiology has paved the way to deliver enterprise solutions that consolidate image handling and maintain workflow efficiency in the most image intense departments. Women’s Health View all 62 items Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Technology Reports View all 9 items Sponsored Content | Videos | Enterprise Imaging | January 18, 2017 Sectra Enterprise Image Management Solutions Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videoslast_img read more

Dont keep the change say Aussie travellers

first_img“Most people working in the service industry in the US don’t get the same sort of hourly pay rates or benefits Australian workers get so they are looking to make additional money with tips.” Over 1,000 Australians aged 18-64 participated in the online survey. According to a Galaxy Research poll, only 40 percent of Australian tourists will tip at the standard rate for the country they are visiting, while 38 percent will tip for exceptional service only. The rate for tipping in the US has long been regarded as 15 percent.  “It’s something that is part of their culture and if you’re travelling in another country you normally try to fit in with the culture of another country, even though it may be a little bit out of the norm for Australians,” he remarked. At home, the poll found 63 percent of Australians tipped only for exceptional service whilst 22 percent disregarded tipping altogether.  I’ve long told friends travelling to the US to carry one-dollar bills for tipping purposes. Well it seems many have either ignored the advice altogether, or heeded it a little to literally, with Aussie travellers being confirmed by a recent study as being very poor tippers. Source = ETB News: M.H. But Visit USA Australia president Geoffrey Hutton says Australians travelling to the US should be prepared to pay up to 20 percent in restaurants, bars and even for taxi drivers, News Limited reported. Image tippingresearch.com Tellingly, Carnival Cruise Lines removed gratuities from the American ship Carnival Spirit when it commenced operations in Australia last year; it will do likewise for Carnival Legend when it begins sailing Down Under next September. last_img read more