Law change to prompt German fund buying

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Bristol investment

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PCM snapped up by Colliers and Conrad Ritblat

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CLS jumps on revaluation bandwagon

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L&G to double shopping centre

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The omnipresent occupier

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Halladale captures £22.7m Great Yarmouth centre

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Trump ‘offered pardon’ to Assange if he denied Russia leak, court hears

first_imgAssange’s defence cited a statement from Robinson in which she said that Rohrabacher had been to see Assange and said “on instructions from the president, he was offering a pardon or some other way out, if Mr Assange… said Russia had nothing to do with the DNC leaks”.District Judge Vanessa Baraitser said the evidence was admissable.Robinson did not respond to emailed and telephone requests from AFP for comment.US intelligence agencies have concluded Russia hacked into the computer servers of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) during Trump’s campaign against Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.WikiLeaks later published the emails, which proved politically damaging to Clinton, before the November 2016 vote.Australian national Assange, 48, is facing 18 counts in the US — 17 of them under the Espionage Act.None of them is related to the DNC hack and instead concern WikiLeaks’s publication of diplomatic and defence cables about US campaigns in Afghanistan and Iraq.Trump has played down Russia’s involvement in the DNC leak, including when he appeared to side with Russian President Vladimir Putin over his own intelligence agency’s assessment of what happened.”I have great confidence in my intelligence people, but I will tell you that President Putin was extremely strong and powerful in his denial today,” Trump said during a joint press appearance with Putin during their July 2018 summit in Helsinki.The extradition hearing is set to start at Woolwich Crown Court, which is next to the high-security Belmarsh prison where he is being held.The hearing is expected to last all week, before being adjourned for three months, to resume on May 18. Assange appeared at the administrative hearing via videolink, wearing dark tracksuit bottoms and a brown jumper over a white shirt.He spoke only to confirm his name and date of birth. He sat and held a pile of papers throughout the hearing.Topics : “The president barely knows Dana Rohrabacher other than he’s an ex-congressman. He’s never spoken to him on this subject or almost any subject. It is a complete fabrication and a total lie,” Trump press secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement.”This is probably another never-ending hoax and total lie” by the Democratic Party, she said, a day after Trump controversially pardoned or issued other forms of clemency to 11 people including a former governor jailed for corruption, and other high-profile white-collar criminals.The revelation came at a case management hearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court before Monday’s formal start of Washington’s extradition request for him to face espionage charges.If found guilty in the United States, he could be jailed for 175 years. US President Donald Trump promised to pardon WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange if he denied Russia leaked emails of his 2016 election rival’s campaign, a London court was told on Wednesday.Assange’s lawyer Jennifer Robinson said in a document that Trump relayed the offer through former US Congressman Dana Rohrabacher, the UK’s domestic Press Association news agency reported.The White House quickly issued a denial that Trump had dangled a pardon in exchange for help in the Russia controversy, which has cast a shadow over his first term in office.last_img read more

COVID-19: Indonesia’s tally of confirmed cases rises to 6

first_imgTwo more patients have tested positive for the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed cases in Indonesia up to six, the Health Ministry announced on Sunday. “Today, based on laboratory tests, two more cases have tested positive,” Health Ministry Disease Control and Prevention Directorate general secretary Achmad Yurianto said in a press conference at the State Palace in Central Jakarta on Sunday afternoon.“The first, Case 5, is a 55-year-old man who is part of the Jakarta cluster,” he said, referring to a number of suspected and confirmed cases connected to a Japanese woman who tested positive for COVID-19 in Malaysia after visiting Jakarta in February. Read also: Indonesia confirms new cases, calls for calmCase 6, Yurianto said, is a 36-year-old man who was among the Indonesian crew members of the virus-stricken Diamond Princess cruise ship that was docked in Yokohama, Japan. The man and 68 other crew members were evacuated to Sebaru Island, Jakarta to undergo quarantine. “Both men are stable and do not require oxygen or IV fluids. They are fully conscious. They don’t have a fever, cough, or runny nose,” he said. He added that Case 5 was being treated at the Sulianti Saroso Infectious Diseases Hospital in North Jakarta, while Case 6 was being treated at the Persahabatan Central General Hospital in East Jakarta. (kmt)Topics :last_img read more

New Zealand mosque shooter changes plea to guilty

first_img ‘The right direction’ Tarrant’s trial had been due to start on June 2 and last some six weeks, with police commissioner Mike Bush saying Thursday’s hearing was arranged after the gunman contacted his lawyers on Tuesday.”Police appreciate this news will come as a surprise to the victims and the public, some of whom may have wished to be present in the courtroom,” he said in a statement.Bush said imams from the Al Noor and Linwood mosques, the ones targeted by Tarrant, were among only 17 people allowed in court to hear the revised plea.New Zealand’s small and tight-knit Muslim community welcomed the fact that they would not have to endure a drawn-out trial raking over painful details of the worst mass shooting in the country’s modern history.”I have been praying for him and he has taken the right direction,” Farid Ahmed, whose wife Husna was killed, told TVNZ.”I am pleased he is feeling guilty. It is a good start.”Tarrant armed himself with an arsenal of semi-automatic weapons and attacked the Al Noor mosque first, before moving on to the Linwood prayer center, livestreaming the killings as he went.His victims were all Muslim and included children, women and the elderly.In a rambling manifesto posted online before the killing spree, Tarrant said he had moved to New Zealand with the specific aim of conducting an atrocity against Muslims.The document said he became radicalized while travelling around Europe, although intelligence agencies have so far failed to find any evidence he was working with right-wing extremist groups. His actions prompted Ardern, who has vowed never to say the killer’s name, to tighten New Zealand’s gun laws and launch a campaign to curb online extremism. An Australian far-right extremist charged with murdering 51 Muslim worshippers in last year’s mass shooting at two New Zealand mosques unexpectedly flipped his plea to guilty on Thursday.Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and the Muslim community expressed relief at the surprise decision, which removes the need for a lengthy trial that authorities feared would be used to spout neo-Nazi propaganda.Self-avowed white supremacist Brenton Tarrant, 29, had previously denied 51 charges of murder, 40 of attempted murder and one of terrorism but reversed his plea in a hurriedly arranged court hearing. “Yes, guilty,” Tarrant told Christchurch High Court via videolink from Auckland Prison as the charges were read out to him.Tarrant, wearing a grey top, stared intently at the camera while making his confession.Neither the former gym instructor from the Australian country town of Grafton nor his lawyers offered any explanation for the change, which makes him New Zealand’s first-ever convicted terrorist.The South Pacific nation does not have the death penalty but Tarrant faces the prospect of spending the rest of his life behind bars. The terror and murder charges all carry life sentences, setting a minimum non-parole period of 17 years but giving the judge power to imprison without the possibility of release. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said the admission of guilt would provide some relief to the many people whose lives were shattered in the attack.”These guilty pleas and conviction bring accountability for what happened and also save the families who lost loved ones, those who were injured, and other witnesses, the ordeal of a trial,” she said.Asked how she reacted upon hearing the news, Ardern replied: “I let out a huge sigh of relief”.Judge Cameron Mander recorded convictions on all charges and said Tarrant would be sentenced at a date yet to be determined.”The guilty pleas represent a very significant step towards bringing finality to this criminal proceeding,” he said.The plea came with New Zealand in its first day of a four-week COVID-19 lockdown.Mander said sentencing would take place “at a time when victims and their families can attend the court in person”.The judge said advance reporting that Thursday’s hearing was taking place was suppressed in case Tarrant changed his mind at the last minute and maintained his innocence. Topics :last_img read more